Up on Primrose Hill

Happy December to you all! We’ve been keeping busy, but especially so getting the house decked out for the holidays. Usually around this time of year I just feel so stressed trying to beat the crowds, schlepping through the subway, the pressure of getting all my shopping done and I become a “scrooge” as my husband would say, but this year it feels different. It’s exciting. Our first Christmas in our new house. We’re starting our own traditions and making this home more us, which makes this year particularly special. One of those new traditions is cutting down our Christmas tree at a tree farm. This is not something Ryan or I grew up doing and with so many farms up here in the Hudson Valley it feels so good to contribute to the local community while taking in the beautiful scenery.

Since we’re newbies to the area a little research led us to Saltsman Christmas Tree Farm in Rhinebeck. We had our hearts set on going here. Ryan and I have consistently changing work schedules and we sometimes tend to do weekend activities on weekdays, so we were pumped to know we could visit on a Monday. We were all set driving through the smokey dense fog and when we pulled up to the long driveway there was a sign hanging, “Sorry, we’re closed”. We were crushed and soon after learned that most farms are closed during the week, especially on a Monday. We almost gave up and were going to postpone to later in the week until we found Primrose Hill Tree Farm. We took a chance and upon arrival found ourselves feeling slightly spooked since we were the only people there. Even the owners were missing and left a note stating to serve yourself! We were already so invested so that’s just what we did, served ourselves and it was perfect. Eerily beautiful with the weather in a foggy state, old red barns scattered around the property and the best part no crowds. It felt like we were in the English countryside and had all the trees at our disposal.

I immediately sighted a gorgeous Concolor Fir - the one with the long eyelash-like needles. It was perfect, but of course we had to roam around to scope out the rest. Very unprepared with no gloves and water soaked shoes we circled back to the first one, chopped it down and gave it a home. Standing close to 11 feet tall, we managed to do all the heavy lifting, netting and tying to the car ourselves. Quite an experience and a strong start to the holiday season with the initiation of this new tradition. Next year, gloves and waterproof shoes are a must!

(Side note: The history of the farm is incredible - read it here.)